United Arab Emirates Deploys Drones To Sanitize The Country

Drones were deployed in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the fight against the Coronavirus outbreak.

United Arab Emirates deploys drones to sanitize the country

United Arab Emirates Deploys Drones To Sanitize The Country

Drones were deployed in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the fight against the Coronavirus outbreak.

By

Mohamed Alagteaa

Drones were deployed in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the fight against the Coronavirus outbreak. The virus, named COVID-19 has been spreading like wildfire across the globe and measures to safely and successfully combat this global health hazard called for creative solutions.

Drones guarantee limited contact, by which the virus is transmitted, and yield fast and efficient results. The avail of drones was first adopted in Wuhan, China the world’s epicentre of the virus. It gave Chinese officials the ability to send and retrieve medical equipment and samples, monitor citizens to ensure no one broke quarantine guidelines and sanitize the streets. They went as far as attaching the flying motors with thermal cameras to scan crowds and identify those who might need medical treatment.

Like the UAE, Indonesia, the world’s most populous Muslim-majority country used drones to spray crowded urban areas with disinfectant. 

French police also tested the prospect of surveillance drones to locate anyone breaking the country’s confinement laws, while police in Madrid, one the most impacted cities in Europe, used drones with speakers to disperse gatherings and order people to return home. 


This sudden rise of drones raised questions on how the impact of these kinds of solutions will have on the world after the situation comes to an end.

The turbo-speed technology is moving toward was already a matter of apprehension among those concerned with surveillance, human rights and privacy issues.

While the application of surveillance drones in Wuhan, and possible adoption in Europe, was a response to a health crisis, it showcases that these tools can be used for purposes not in the best interest of the public.

Social distance or new norm?

COVID-19 forced an estimated 1.7 billion people of the planet’s population to isolation. Health professional’s advice to maintain a safe distance with others and avoid leaving homes unless for absolute necessity allowed the manifestation of a futuristic fantasy, we only saw in movies to become a reality.

Online schools, Zoom meetings, facetime birthday parties, drones delivering everything you need right to your doorsteps.

The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) drones market is expected to grow to USD 48.88 Billion by 2023, according to Markets and Markets, with commercial drones expected to hold the largest market share.  

Even finding love was made possible with these gadgets. 

A New York photographer went viral after he asked his neighbour on a date during quarantine. How?

With a drone.

His video documenting the whole shenanigan was viewed more than eight million times so far, and while the endeavour is heart-warming, it gives an insight on how these devices will shape our social interactions and lives in general. It poses questions about human welfare and rights.

But mainly, when we are free to roam the earth again, will we?

 

The Double Standard Between Billie Eilish And Muslim Women

Unlike the many young and attractive starlets in Hollywood, the five-time Grammy winner is known not for her scandalous red carpet looks or showing off her Kardashian-like curvy figure, but rather, the opposite.

The double standard between Billie Eilish and Muslim women

The Double Standard Between Billie Eilish And Muslim Women

Unlike the many young and attractive starlets in Hollywood, the five-time Grammy winner is known not for her scandalous red carpet looks or showing off her Kardashian-like curvy figure, but rather, the opposite.

By

Rania Rizvi

If you’re going to praise Billie Eilish for her modesty, praise the Muslim women who have been doing it for centuries, too. 

Up-and-coming pop sensation Billie Eilish is not like the other stars. 

Unlike the many young and attractive starlets in Hollywood, the five-time Grammy winner is known not for her scandalous red carpet looks or showing off her Kardashian-like curvy figure, but rather, the opposite. 

The 18 year-old “Bad Guy” singer can almost always be found sporting abundantly baggy sweaters and t-shirts, knee length shorts, facial veils, and gloves on her Instagram and even at the Oscars. 

Eilish’s style has undoubtedly been a topic of discussion for years. While other teenagers blindly follow trends to emulate the overdone and revealing style of social media stars, the media is captivated by Eilish’s overt rejection of flashy fashion norms and ability to make a statement by covering up. 

Many are stunned by how such a young person completely defied Hollywood’s sexualized status quo, and in Calvin Klein’s 2019 #MyTruth campaign, Eilish finally broke the silence on it.

Unveiling the truth behind her unconventional style, Eilish reveals that she “never wants the world to know everything about me” and that by hiding her figure under over-sized clothing, “nobody can have an opinion because they haven’t seen what’s underneath.” 

Since the campaign, the teen star has not only been praised by her predominantly female fanbase, but also by mainstream media, for being revolutionary and inspirational for rebelling Hollywood’s overtly-sexual, predatory culture. 

The New York Times titles Eilish as “Gen Z’s Outrageous Fashion Role Model;” Vogue claims Eilish is “reinventing pop stardom” with her “anti-fashion sense.” 

While critics claim that Eilish is being “self-conscious” or shouldn’t be affected by the gaze of others, Refinery 29 praises Eilish for being a symbol of female empowerment through her resistance of a “culture [that] feels entitled to women’s and gender-diverse people’s bodies.” 

But what the media fails to realize is that Eilish’s practice of covering herself to ward off the unwanted gaze of others is nothing new or revolutionary at all— Muslim women have been practicing this for centuries. 

Throughout the Quran, the importance and benefits of modesty is heavily emphasized as a way to protect oneself from evil, internal and external.  As stated in Surah Al-Ahzab, women are instructed to “wrap their outer garments around themselves” to preserve their piety and “not be harassed” (33:59). Evidently, this well-intended verse encourages women to cover for the sake of avoiding physical discomfort from unwanted glances, aiming to put them at mental ease. 

Yet, for decades, society has critiqued Muslim women for falling subject to the “oppressive”  beauty standards of the East and that wearing the hijab is an extreme restriction imposed to limit their sexuality and beauty. 

Even fame and international recognition cannot protect Muslim women from scrutiny. In a 2016 interview with the Guardian, fencer and Olympic medal winner Ibtihaj Muhammad opened up about the “psycholgical warfare” and discrimination that she endured as the first Muslim woman and hijab wearer to compete at the games.

While Muslim women around the globe suffer in silence for covering up, Eilish’s modest dressing gets her interviews from Vogue. 

While Muslim women are harassed for adorning their hijabs as a representation of their faith and a shield from predation, Eilish is a “rebel” and a trend-setter, glorified for her “brave” choice to preserve her beauty and blazing a new path towards women’s liberation. 

 

This double standard is not only absurd, but is a result of the media’s profound ignorance towards Islam. When a pop star chooses to be modest, it is not linked with religion, but rather a strong-willed choice to be “defiant.” But when Muslim women cover because Islam encourages such modesty, they are seen as repressed and shackled to Eastern world ideals. 

This is not to pin Eilish as a “bad guy” for being modest; she has a right to show and conceal whatever she wants. If anything, Eilish’s style going viral has been instrumental in proving to the world that “covering up” does not have to be prudish or meek; it can be just as bold and cool, if not more, than showing skin. 

After all, women, regardless of their religious and racial backgrounds, are all subject to catcalling, body shaming, and uncomfortable attention. If dressing modestly is their way of coping with these things, whether it be because of Islam or personal reasons, what difference does it make? 

Ultimately, a woman’s choice to dress modestly (or not) is her own and regardless of the reason — whether it be religious, sociocultural, or both — should be respected. 

Eilish did nothing wrong. But if we are going to reward people like Billie Eilish for being bold for her choice to be modest, then we ought to recognize all the Muslim women who were doing it way before it was in fashion.

Quran Verses For When You’re Feeling Low In Faith

Use these verse for when you need a boost.

Quran Verses For When You’re Feeling Low In Faith

Use these verse for when you need a boost.

By

Mohamed Alagteaa

Much like the Hunger Games, life is an arena filled with challenges, hurdles and people trying to take you out, and while we wish the odds to always be in our favour, sometimes it feels like they rarely are.

To navigate the world as a young Muslim, failures have an extra layer of disappointment that we so often put on ourselves and the source of this behaviour is important to discuss, but here, we would like only to share a simple and easily accessible remedy to help you get through your difficult day.

Before delving into these beautiful Ayat, it is important to underline that they are in no way or form a substitute for professional help. There is a difference between having a bad day and a mental issue. If you are truly struggling, know that Allah is there for you, and so is therapy in all its forms.

1- “God tasks no soul beyond its capacity.” (2:286) al-Bagarah

The last verse of the longest surah in the Quran is an empowering statement from Allah to his servants. When your deadlines are due, things at home are not good, your friends are not there for you and everything is falling apart and you are drenched and overwhelmed, recite this verse out loud.

Know you are strong, powerful and incredible, because with everything going south, you sense God’s belief in you, in your capability to overcome whatever you are put through.

Allah is literally telling you, you got this.

2- Whosoever does evil or wrongs himself, and then seeks forgiveness of God, he will find God Forgiving, Merciful. (4:110) al-Nisa

Mistakes are inevitable. You will make them.

No matter how mild or severe in nature they are, the aftermath of our mishaps has such a heavy negative load on our psychological well-being. This verse from surah number 4 of the Quran should be on a mental post-it in your mind whenever the light at the end

of the tunnel of life seems dimmed. The cathartic power of this verse is that it

recognizes that any evil we commit towards others is a wound we inflict on ourselves. The medicine is forgiveness, and what is more of a sign of pure love than to know that Allah’s doors are always open.

That light is never turned off.

3- And We will indeed test you with something of fear and hunger, and loss of wealth, souls, and fruits; and give glad tidings to the patient— those who, when affliction befalls them, say, “Truly we are God’s, and unto Him we return.” (2:156) Al-Bagarah

This verse is a reminder to never forget, no matter what is going on in your life, your final destination is Allah, and patience is the path towards arriving safely to that terminus. While most of us heard this verse during incredibly tumultuous times,

remember it when you get caught up in all the mundane little problems of your life and see how they become insignificant and unworthy of your attention and energy.

4- For truly with hardship comes ease! Truly with hardship comes ease! (94:5/6) Al-Sharh

When we are having a bad day, we tend to forget that it will be over at some point. This verse from Surah al-Sharh is a beautiful reminder of how intertwined the experience of distress with the relief of tranquillity. We can never really appreciate our good days without the countless bad ones. They inform each other and allow us to know deep down and in the thick of it that easing through is possible.

5- And your Lord has said, “Call upon Me, and I shall respond to you. (40:60) Ghafir

There aren’t many things that can lift your spirit after a dreadful day like a conversation with someone who loves you. Yet, even the ones who care most about us are often busy and tangled up in their own chaos. This verse is an extended invitation that is never revoked, retracted nor withheld. Allah is forever there, listening attentively to what you have to say, without any interruption.

Make the call, Allah will answer.

The Quran puts things into perspective and reminds us of the strength we possess, the blessings we have and the forgiveness we can attain and should practice. These  verses are only the tip of the iceberg that is our miraculous healing book.

How Muslim Teens Are Coping In A Post-Trump United States

There was the Muslim ban, a series of discriminatory executive orders in which President Trump prevented nationals of several Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States, ended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Sudan and limited it for Syrians, Yemenis, and Somalis, and drastically lowered the annual refugee admission cap, notwithstanding the fact that numerous Muslim refugees entering the United States are fleeing countries whose violence the United States set the foundation for.

NEWS 

How Muslim Teens Are Coping In A Post-Trump United States

In the history textbooks of tomorrow, the experiences of Muslims during the Trump presidency will likely be reduced to the structural and physical violence experienced by Muslims.
There was the Muslim ban, a series of discriminatory executive orders in which President Trump prevented nationals of several Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States, ended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Sudan and limited it for Syrians, Yemenis, and Somalis, and drastically lowered the annual refugee admission cap, notwithstanding the fact that numerous Muslim refugees entering the United States are fleeing countries whose violence the United States set the foundation for.

By

Srihari Nageswaran Ravi

 

In the history textbooks of tomorrow, the experiences of Muslims during the Trump presidency will likely be reduced to the structural and physical violence experienced by Muslims. 

 

There was the Muslim ban, a series of discriminatory executive orders in which President Trump prevented nationals of several Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States, ended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Sudan and limited it for Syrians, Yemenis, and Somalis, and drastically lowered the annual refugee admission cap, notwithstanding the fact that numerous Muslim refugees entering the United States are fleeing countries whose violence the United States set the foundation for. 

There were the murders of Nia Wilson and Nabra Hassanen, two Black Muslim teenage girls, in Oakland, CA, and Reston, VA, respectively. There were a variety of inexplicable comments Trump made about Islam and Muslims and even more that his supporters made that are often left without question. Yet although these are the more palpable effects of Trump-era Islamophobia, they are by no means exhaustive: much of the pain facing Muslims during the presidency of Donald Trump is deeply psychological.

When asked by Muslim how they are coping with Trump as a world leader, a 15-year old anonymous @Muslim follower stated:

I was 11 when [Trump] was elected and before that, I didn’t know the magnitude of the world’s Islamophobia and hatred of Muslims. Trump’s reign has already led to the Muslim ban, the Christchurch mosque terrorist attack, and a spike in hate crimes toward Muslims and I fear what is to come if he is re-elected. Everything Trump says is either unintelligent or offensive and he always ends up emboldening deranged racists, sexists, anti-semites, Islamophobes, xenophobes, etc. There are areas of the U.S. that I wouldn’t even dare travel to because of the hatred Trump has instilled in people. The world is becoming more and more unwelcoming to Muslims…

In late March, we asked our followers – the vast majority of whom are Muslim youth – this same question, in reference to their lives in the United States and the rest of the globe following the election of Donald Trump in 2016. 

Many of the responses expressed general melancholy and misery. Instagram user @_mariah_davis mentioned that as a “Lebanese-American…I feel like I can’t be both [Muslim and American] under his rule.” She has to be “an outsider and lose half [of her] identity or lose [her] Muslim half.” 

This response struck a chord with me – Muslims are often told to forfeit the more discernible aspects of Muslim identity (hijab, topi/kufi, etc.) because Islamic and American identities are presented as mutually-exclusive in the Western imagination. 

Trump’s presidency also marked a bit of an eye-opening for some American Muslims: Instagram user @_barelyawake_ notes that it “made [them] realize half [of] this country doesn’t care about anyone else but themselves.” 

For many American Muslims, Trump’s election is not something easily dismissed: even without taking into consideration both his blatant and implicit Islamophobia, the marginalized backgrounds that many American Muslims share – from lack of healthcare access to exorbitant student debt –  is aggravated by Trump’s presidency. 

Various responses spoke of an antithesis to this: instead of feeling dismay concerning Trump’s presidency, it has inspired patience, confidence, and/or political apathy. Instagram user @yasminfenaoui noted that she’s “openly displayed Islam and talked about it more,” indicating that attacks on her Muslim identity inspired newfound expressions of confidence in her faith whereas Instagram user @siddubaba has ignored Trump to avoid “giving [his] supporters a platform or satisfaction by engaging” and to “live life normally,” indicating that allowing violent rhetoric toward American Muslims affect one’s own conception of their identity merely allows Islamophobia to thrive. 

Other users noted their heightened desire to see positivity in the little things despite it all or their renewed search for patience amidst the terror. Evident in this, perhaps, is the complex beauty of Islam. Islam is unique in that it signifies both a rationale to oppress and a means to flee oppression: by seeking solace through prayer to Allah (SWT), making dhikr, reading Qu’ran, and more, Muslims are able to find comfort, support, and love despite being criminalized and targeted for their Muslim identity. 

 

The response of @itss_meh__, in particular, stood out from the rest: 

 

“Honestly, [Trump] is not that extreme toward Muslims. Let’s be real: all U.S. presidents, including Obama, [have] done something toward Muslims. They were just not [as straightforward]. No president over the decades has been a saint [toward] the Muslim community. Trump is no different.” 

In many ways, this is true: it would be dishonest to claim that President Trump isn’t continuing the legacy of his predecessors. Sure, Obama denounced Islamophobia and Bush said “Islam is peace,” but in what way did either of these men try to deconstruct the structural manifestations of the prejudices Americans have had toward Islam since the first ships carrying enslaved African Muslims arrived on its shores? It’s hard to deduce: under a political climate in which a well-known Democratic political candidate was able to shy away from his past surveillance of New York City’s Muslim communities and relations between different religious groups are seen as an individual political issue as opposed to one that intersects foreign policy, criminal justice, gun violence, and more, it’s understandable that Muslims interpret Trump’s Islamophobic rhetoric, albeit abrasive, as not entirely a new development but rather a manifestation of existing sentiments against American Muslims no longer hid behind closed doors. 

The wide variety in responses concerning how Muslim youth are coping with the Trump presidency leading into this year’s presidential election only emphasizes the tremendous diversity of the American Muslim community: Just as there is no one Muslim experience, there is no one way to deal with the impact of Trump’s presidency on Muslims. Finding strength during difficult times can be tough, but American Muslims are no stranger to that struggle. 

 

Even in times of great hardship, there is still so much beauty in Muslim resilience.

 

Dear Non-Muslims, There Are Things Muslim Youth Are Tired Of Hearing

Islam is a religion that has been around for centuries, yet it seems that in modern times people act like it’s something that has just been born.

Life Style

Dear Non-Muslims, There Are Things Muslim Youth Are Tired Of Hearing

By

Aishah Goumaneh

Islam has been a religion that has been around for centuries, yet it seems that in modern times people act like it’s something that has just been born. Oftentimes non-Muslims ask questions, questions that are ignorant. However, it is not exactly humanity’s fault. Society has painted these negative images of the Muslim community, that’s on them. Yet it is up to you to stop choosing to be ignorant. I bet, and hope, you’re tired of asking these questions. Trust me Muslims are tired of hearing it. To get to know your Muslim neighbors better don’t say these things, and you just might be invited to the next Jummah

1. Do you speak Muslim?

I​ cannot stress enough how much this question hurts our little hurts. The definition of a Muslim is someone who follows and believes in the religion of Islam. You cannot speak Christian, Jewish, or Catholic, so it doesn’t make much sense for people to believe you can speak Muslim. There are Muslims everywhere, some speak Spanish, Turkish, Arabic, some just even English. So if you want to know what language us Muslims speak, please take into account that that are 7 continents, over 100 countries, and over 6,000 languages, every single Muslim does not speak the same language.

2. “Do you wear that when you sleep?”

This goes out to all the Hijabis. So many times Muslims women who wear the Hijab get asked questions like, “are you bald”, “do you shower with it on?” “Why do you wear that on your head?”. It gets tiring trust me. First things first, learn what the headpiece on our heads are called, the word has five letters and two syllables it is not that hard to learn, don’t be scared to say the word Hijab. Second please do some research on what the Hijab is, why, when, and how we wear it. Also, no one is forced to wear the hijab, everyone has their own-self will. Essentially the Hijab is an important part of Islam, instead of gutting your neighbor’s poor hijabi heart maybe just ask google.

3. Assuming every Arab is Muslim

Here are the basics, not every Muslim is Arab, and not all Arabs are Muslim. Islan did originate in what is now the Middle East, however it spread to many parts of the world. People like Mans Musa brought Islam to Africa. Today there are Latino Muslims, Asian Muslims, white-European Muslims. Muslims are everywhere. Islam is not attached to one race, it is attached to those who believe in it.

4. “You’re Muslim?”

Although​ Islam has been around for centuries people still have trouble identifying Muslims. This question, I’ve noticed, gets asked towards the girls who wear Hijab more. From my understanding, people seem to confuse Muslims with Nuns. Although both cover their heads, nuns have very distinct clothing, the traditional black dress, with the white-collar. Muslim women can just wear anything that is modest.

Are you muslim

5. “You Can’t even drink water?”

During​ the holy month of Ramadan, Muslims around the world don’t eat or drink fromSunrise to Sundown. The part that confuses people the most is that Muslims can’t drink water. If I had a dollar for every time I was asked this I could pay my college funds in cash. In all seriousness, I understand that it is hard to understand not eating for 10+ hours straight. However yes the water is included, water is a drink, drinks are liquid. Which passes the test of being something to not drink during Ramadan

6. “Pork is sooooo good”

For anyone who doesn’t no Muslims are prohibited from eating pork as pigs are considered dirty. When people find this out their first reaction is usually “but ham is soo good”, yes Susan I’m sure it is. Telling Muslims pork is good is not very important information, what do you expect them to do with it? I am happy that you like pork so much but we won’t be eating it.