Ramadan 101: All You Need To Know About The Holy Month

Here's all you need to know about the Holy Month of Ramadan, with visuals!

Ramadan 101: All You Need To Know About The Holy Month

Here’s all you need to know about the Holy Month of Ramadan, with visuals!

By

Maliha Rahman
Art - Michelle Fan

 

Whether you’re Muslim or non-Muslim, there are many ways someone can participate in Ramadan festivities – by gaining knowledge through a fellow Muslim friend during this month, or simply trying to find more ways to participate during Ramadan as a way to gain even more rewards. 

What is ‘Ramadan’?

Ramadan is a time to gather and observe the ninth month of an Islmaic calendar year by abstaining from indulgence and praying to become closer to God. The month of Ramadan is a sacred month because it marks when Allah (SWT) gave the first chapters of the Qur’an to Prophet Muhammad. Let’s dive right into the conceptual of Ramadan.

 

Art - Michelle Fan


What is ‘suhoor’? 


Suhoor is the meal consumed before sunrise as the meal before the day of fasting begins. This meal is very important because those that fast need to make sure they have an intake of meals that will give them high energy, throughout the day. The day of fasting lasts from sunrise to sunset, which means participants need to ensure there is enough energy, especially if they are working, as well.


Art - Michelle Fan

 

 

How many times do we pray? 

 

In our daily lives as Muslims, we are asked to pray five times a day, whether it’s during Ramadan or not. The five prayers are named Fajr, Zuhur, Asr, Maghreb, and Isha. After suhoor takes place, it’s time to pray Fajr because Fajr also takes place prior to sunrise. The next prayer, Zuhr, takes place after noon. In the late afternoon, Asr takes place followed by Maghreb, which happens after sunset. Lastly, Isha prayer happens before going to sleep, as a way to remember God before heading into the night.

 

 

Art - Michelle Fan

 

 

What is ‘taraweeh’?

 

During Ramadan, there is a voluntary prayer offered which is called, Taraweeh. Taraweeh is led by the congregation as a way to listen to the recitation of the Qur’an and as a way to pray voluntarily. This process, in itself, is extremely spiritually beneficial and is one of the gifts we are given by Allah (SWT) during the month of Ramadan. **Please note, that not all Muslims sectors partake in Taraweeh.

 

Art - Michelle Fan

 

 

What is ‘iftar’? 

 

As mentioned before, Maghreb takes place when the sun sets, as does iftar. A Muslims’ fast opens up when the sunset has taken place and Maghreb time has begun as well. Typically, you open your fast with something small such as a date or dried fruit before going and praying Maghreb. After praying Maghreb, Muslims continue to eat their larger meals as a way to give their body the fuel needed after fasting, since sunrise. 

 

Art - Michelle Fan

 

 

Who can fast? 

 

Fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam, which means we are all obligated to fast, but there are exemptions. People who are recognized as exempted from fasting include those who have health problems – being ill or having to take medications. Also, women who are nursing or pregnant – nursing and pregnancies, both, are times where your body needs continuous nourishment. Women who are menstruating are not allowed to fast, during this month, as well.

 

 

Art - Michelle Fan

 

 

Why do Muslims fast? 

 

 

The question is often asked – why do we fast? As Muslims, we’re granted this month by Allah (SWT) as a gift to become closer with Him. By praying and doing things like reading the Qur’an, we bring knowledge into our minds and remembrance into our hearts. Ramadan is a month of bringing our relationship closer to God and giving back, in small ways such as charity, donating to the local mosque, and many more – anything small counts.

 

Art - Michelle Fan

 

We hope that this article was informative. Feel free to share this with your friends and inshAllah you can make the most out of the Holy Month. Ramadan Kareem!

 

Muslim.co Partners Up With Instagram This Ramadan For #MonthOfGood

@Muslim will be sharing tips on how to spread positivity throughout Ramadan to promote the #MonthOfGood

Muslim.co Partners Up With Instagram This Ramadan For #MonthOfGood

@Muslim will be sharing tips on how to spread positivity throughout Ramadan to promote the #MonthOfGood

By

Muslim
Photo - Instagram

 

Ramadan Kareem to you all! The Muslim Team wishes you well during this time, and we hope that this Holy Month provides clarity and ease on to you and your loved ones. We understand that the current circumstances do not allow us to have the most eventful Ramadan, but may Allah (swt) reward us for our patience, and allow us to grow and learn throughout this time. 

Knowing that Ramadan will be going digital this year, we hope to become a central online safe space for our community, and ensure that we make the most out of this Holy Month.  

Muslim is proud to announce that with Muslim Girl, we are partnering up with Instagram for the entirety of Ramadan for our #MonthOfGood campaign. The initiative with our campaign is to have the Instagram community share their acts of good — big or small — over the course of the month and to encourage others to do the same, while using the hashtag #MonthOfGood

We will be posting a Q&A on our Instagram story every Monday where your responses will be shared over on our “Ramadan Radio” livestream with Muslim Girl on Tuesdays @ 3PM EST. We have many very special guests that will be featured, so stay tuned for the line up announcement that will be coming out soon!

In the meantime, be sure to head over on to Instagram and share a good deed while using the hashtag #MonthOfGood, and be sure to tag @Muslim for the chance to be reposted on our social media. We created a fun-interactive Ramadan good-deed bingo that can be found on our Instagram highlights here.

Throughout the month on @Instagram, the platform will feature content creators from around the world, including @huda@sarasabry, @amr_maskoun and @imeldaadams.

We are looking forward to this month and hope to see you join us in spreading positivity for the #MonthOfGood!

Meet The Muslim Youth Fighting To Save Our Environment

These Muslim climate activists are on the grounds fighting for a great change.

Meet The Muslim Youth Fighting To Save Our Environment

These Muslim climate activists are on the grounds fighting for a great change.

By

Amirah Ahmed
Photo - Jay Cohen Nasser

The U.S. Youth Climate Strike (USYCS) is a grassroots organization that leads demonstrations and climate justice action by youth activists nation-wide. They have anti-capitalist roots and a mission to bring justice – not only for the environment, but for the marginalized communities affected by climate injustice as well. We spoke with members of the Muslim Caucus about the intersections between their faith and climate justice along with how the youth is still managing to take a stand during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The biggest difference for USYCS given the COVID-19 says Sabreen Tuku, a USYCS organizer from Washington state, is the inability to have a physical strike while everyone is in quarantine.

“Moving everything online has been kind of a struggle because you’re not really striking and kind of lose momentum in a way, but it’s also kind of cool because I think we get to reach more people,” Tuku said. She explained the barricade that social distancing has set on physical organizing efforts.

Her fellow Muslim Caucus member and organizer, Salma Abdi, elaborated on the communication hurdles that come with an online strike compared to physical strikes. She said, “Strikes are intimate things, you get to meet different people, you get to have different conversations and see their perspective when it comes to the crisis or why they’re fighting for climate justice. Whereas now it’s online, it’s not as personal and you won’t get to meet new people and it’s so much harder to expect numbers and what your impact is going to be compared to in-person strikes.”

Tuku optimistically highlighted the opportunity that online organizing can offer. It enables organizers to reach even farther than just those in attendance at strikes, and becomes far more accessible to anyone that wants to get involved.

Faridah Azeez, an organizer for USYCS in Massachusetts, emphasized that any youth can get involved even at the local level. Although state chapters are holding events for Earth Day 2020 all of this week, many are abstaining from events on Friday to respect the first fasting day of Ramadan. 

Azeez said that people “can go online, search up your chapter, and try to get involved that way too.” She was referring to the several state chapters of the Youth Climate Strike scattered across the United States that welcome all support and involvement in their climate justice efforts, which you can find more information on here.


Photo - Alex Madaras

The intersections between the urgency for climate justice and the teachings of Islam are evident in the Quran, “And do not commit abuse on the earth, spreading corruption” (Qur’an, 2:60). There are plenty of hadith from Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) concerning the treatment of the environment. Nedwa Abdi, a member of the Muslim Caucus and USYCS Minnesota’s outreach director, finds that her Muslim identity indeed has an influence on her activism, saying “Islam teaches us, if we see an injustice, try and fix it and not just be a bystander. And so I try to channel that into my activism.”

Sabirah Mahmud, also an organizer for USYCS in Pennsylvania, spoke to us about her motivation to fight for climate justice, and how the effects of climate injustice impact all of us in some way.

Mahmud expressed, “The thing that got me involved is the fact that my family in Bangladesh experiences so many of these climate disasters, and that forced me to get involved.” 

Mahmud pointed out the importance of representation in the climate justice movement. People that have the closest ties to communities that are being affected, and people within those communities themselves, have the strongest capability at making a real impact; which is why groups such as the Muslim Caucus are imperative in amplifying their stories. Speaking to anyone passionate about turning the climate situation around and making change that may be deciding whether or not to get involved, she said, “If they need something to push them, just look at their own story, look at their family heritage, look at where they come from, and that’s where they’ll find it.”

Even in the middle of a pandemic, these Muslim youth are putting in the work to ensure their message is being heard across the country. The USYCS is holding virtual presentations and events throughout quarantine, and just in time for Earth Day 2020! You can learn how to get involved in the cause and participate in these events through the national website and on their social media.